Italian Week – Linguine alla Cecca

I’m having this tonight!!

Romancing the Bee

This is one of my favorite recipes. I’ve made it for years and years.

It’s from Nora Ephron‘s wonderful novel Heartburn, which is a fictional account of her marriage to Carl Bernstein of All The President”s Men fame.

She is a wonderful cook, and the book contains a number of fantastic recipes. I consider it one of my cookbooks!

Linguine alla Cecca is a simple recipe, but oh, so satisfying!  It’s perfect for summer suppers with a loaf of crusty bread. This is my comfort food.

Drop 5 large tomatoes into boiling water for one full minute.  Peel and seed and chop.

Put chopped tomatoes into a large bowl with ½ cup of olive oil, a garlic clove sliced in two  (more garlic is okay. Actually, preferable!) , 1 cup chopped fresh basil leaves, salt and hot red pepper flakes.

Let sit for a couple of hours. Remove…

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Nothing Could Be Finer Than To Be In North Carolina In July!

On July 11-13 I had the great pleasure of attending the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association’s Summer Meeting in Pinehurst, NC!

North Carolina

Pinehurst is absolutely beautiful! Gracious Southern hospitality at its best…

Pinehurst-NC-Resort

I conducted two honey cooking workshops/cooking demonstrations in the Demo Kitchen of the Sandhills Community College. I felt like a food network star!  So much fun!!

Sandhills Community College

Sandhills Community College

Culinary Arts Department

Culinary Arts Department

I made one of my favorites, Honey Tiramisu!

Honey Tiramisu

I made enough for all of the 150 attendees to have a serving. I can now make Tiramisu in my sleep!

The NCSBA is one of the largest and most active beekeeping associations in the US.  It’s also one of the most hospitable!

I picked up lots of helpful information about beekeeping and enjoyed the company of other enthusiastic beekeepers.  I’ll definitely be a return visitor!!

Until We Meet Again

On July 1st my beloved dog The Noble Bayard died suddenly and unexpectedly of heart failure.

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In retrospect I realize he was nearing his end. He slept a lot and resisted taking walks. But he was always there for me when I wanted to play or garden with him. I truly believe he didn’t want me to know he was sick.

The Noble Bayard

The Noble Bayard

I dreaded posting about this but I thought it best to explain my absence online.

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This poem by Byron best expresses my sorrow:

Near this spot
Are deposited the Remains
               Of one
Who possessed Beauty
        Without Vanity,
Strength without Insolence,
  Courage without Ferocity,
And all the Virtues of Man
        Without his Vices.

This praise, which would be unmeaning flattery
          If inscribed over Human Ashes,
Is but a just tribute to the Memory of 
          “Boatswain,” a Dog
Who was born at Newfoundland,
          May, 1803,
And died in Newstead Abbey,
          Nov. 18, 1808.

Health Benefits Of Honey!

NHB-bears-wallpaper-1680x1050

One of the many great things about Farmers’ Markets is that you can find unprocessed honey, also known as raw honey, for sale. Most of the honey sold in grocery stores has been pasteurized and sometimes even blended with cane sugar or corn syrup. However, raw honey is naturally antiseptic and does not need pasteurization.

People have been using raw honey for its health benefits for millennia. Raw honey contains pollen, enzymes, antioxidants and many other beneficial compounds that researchers are just beginning to discover. These compounds largely disappear during processing. The general rule is the darker the raw honey, the more nutritious it is.

Allergy Relief

Recent research supports the theory that local honey– obtained as close as possible to where you live–may help build an immunity to seasonal allergies. Honey made by bees in the vicinity of an allergenic plant will contain tiny amounts of pollen from that plant. This honey will act as a sort of vaccine if taken in small amounts–a few teaspoons per day–for several months, and can provide relief from seasonal pollen-related allergies.

Antioxidants

Raw honey contains powerful cancer-fighting antioxidants, while pasteurized honey does not.

Digestive Aid

Raw honey contains many enzymes that can help some people digest food more easily so it may also help treat ulcers and diarrhea.

Vitamins and Minerals

The nutrient content of raw honey varies (darker honey is more nutritious), but a 1-ounce serving contains very small amounts of folate as well as vitamins B2, C, B6, B5 and B3. Minerals including calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium, selenium, sodium and zinc are also found in raw honey.

Wound and Skin Care

Honey has anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties. It is used by the medical profession to treat wounds, burns, and various other skin conditions including acne.

Cough Suppressant

Honey is also useful in treating upper respiratory infections. Studies have shown that a small dose of raw honey was more effective than an over-the-counter cough treatment. Be sure not to give any honey, either raw or treated, to a child under the age of 12 months.

Blood sugar regulation:

Even though honey contains simple sugars, some researchers believe it does not affect the body in the same way as white sugar or artificial sweeteners. Honey’s exact combination of fructose and glucose may actually help the body regulate blood sugar levels.

In addition to its health benefits, it is a scientific fact that cooking with honey makes food taste better. Honey contains gluconic acid, a completely safe and natural flavor enhancer. According to the National Honey Board, honey “balances and enhances the flavor profiles of other ingredients used in a recipe.”

A little honey makes everything better!