Batty In Cincinnati

The bats are back!!  It’s been years since I’ve seen so many in the night skies !!

I first noticed the frisky flyers a few evenings ago. It’s been a wet summer, and mosquitoes, the bats’ favorite treat, are in abundance.

My next door neighbor was worried the bats were eating my bees, but I assured her that they prefer smaller and less prickly prey. If they eat a few bees, it’s no real loss.  And we could do with a LOT fewer mosquitoes!!

This is good news because bats (specifically the “Indiana bats”) are an endangered species in Ohio.

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis)

batty

The Indiana bat was listed as endangered in 1967 due to episodes of people disturbing hibernating bats in caves during winter, resulting in the death of large numbers of bats. Indiana bats are vulnerable to disturbance because they hibernate in large numbers in only a few caves (the largest hibernation caves support from 20,000 to 50,000 bats). Other threats that have contributed to the Indiana bat’s decline include commercialization of caves, loss of summer habitat, pesticides and other contaminants, and most recently, the disease white-nose syndrome.

Indiana bats are found over most of the eastern half of the United States. Almost half of them hibernate in caves in southern Indiana. The 2009 population estimate was about 387,000 Indiana bats, less than half as many as when the species was listed as endangered in 1967.

Indiana bats are quite small, weighing only one-quarter of an ounce (about the weight of three pennies) although in flight they have a wingspan of 9 to 11 inches. Their fur is dark-brown to black. They hibernate during winter in caves or, occasionally, in abandoned mines. During summer they roost under the peeling bark of dead and dying trees. Indiana bats eat a variety of flying insects found along rivers or lakes and in uplands.

White nose syndrome (WNS) is an illness that has killed over a million bats since 2006 when dead and dying bats, with the distinctive “white nose,” were first observed. “White nose” refers to a ring of white fungus often seen on the faces and wings of affected bats. First observed in a cave in New York in February 2006, white-nose syndrome has spread from New York caves to caves in Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania,

So why should we care?

Bats are essential to the health of our natural world. They help control pests and are vital pollinators and seed-dispersers for countless plants. Yet these wonderfully diverse and beneficial creatures are among the least studied and most misunderstood of animals.

Centuries of myths and misinformation still generate needless fears and threaten bats and their habitats around the world. Bat populations are declining almost everywhere. Losing bats would have devastating consequences for natural ecosystems and human economies. Knowledge is the key. Bat Conservation International has been combining education, research and conservation to protect bats worldwide since 1982.

The more than 1,200 species of bats – about one-fifth of all mammal species – are incredibly diverse. They range from the world’s smallest mammal, the tiny bumblebee bat that weighs less than a penny to giant flying foxes with six-foot wingspans. Except for the most extreme desert and polar regions, bats have lived in almost every habitat on Earth since the age of the dinosaurs.

Bats are primary predators of night-flying insects, including many of the most damaging agricultural pests and others that bedevil the rest of us. More than two-thirds of bat species hunt insects, and they have healthy appetites. A single little brown bat can eat up to 1,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour, while a pregnant or lactating female bat typically eats the equivalent of her entire body weight in insects each night.

Almost a third of the world’s bats feed on the fruit or nectar of plants. In return for their meals, these bats are vital pollinators of countless plants (many of great economic value) and essential seed dispersers with a major role in regenerating rainforests.

So, bats are the honey bees of the night. I’m celebrating their return to the Cincinnati skies!!

9 thoughts on “Batty In Cincinnati

  1. Rachel says:

    During the past month, five sites in the south east of England, the first records ever, have been confirmed as having the fungus causing white nose syndrome. However, it is known to be present in some caves in Europe without infecting bats, so fingers crossed.

  2. That’s good news. We’ve seen more this year, here in Illinois, than the past few years. Anything that eats mosquitoes is okay for me. Thanks for all the links and information.

  3. We’ve seen a lot of bats in the Nashville area recently. Have you ever seen the bats in Austin, TX? They’re definitely not endangered there. The Ann Richards Congress Ave. Bridge is the world’s largest urban bat colony. It’s really something to see.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_W._Richards_Congress_Avenue_Bridge

  4. I am so grateful there is someone like you keeping us informed on things I would not think to investigate. Knowing how necessary they are, is anything being done to protect their habitats? How can we help? When I get my own home and yard, I’ll make butterfly and bat houses but that’s only a temp solution. When will we learn??? I hope before it’s too late. Thanks for all this wonderful information.

  5. Thos003 says:

    That is great news.. especially with the millions of bats dying from the white nose syndrome.

    Thanks for celebrating the return of the bats!

  6. This post is fascinating. What an awful-sounding disease for the poor bats!
    Any tips for a nasty yellow-jack sting? I have a four or five-inch welt from a sting yesterday, that is still really uncomfortable (they never get me this badly!). I put onion on it when it happened, to stop the immediate pain, but now that it has swollen to this degree I am not even finding calamine lotion helpful. Tips from the expert?

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